Lesson 47: Revival and the Eagerness of God (65:1-25)

This week we are focusing on Isaiah 65:1-25. The following are some study suggestions to help you get started.

LIMITED TIME:

  1. Read through Isaiah 65:1-25.
  2. Meditate on and/or journal the answers to the following questions.
    1. What does this passage teach me about God and His character?
    2. How does this aspect of God’s character change my view of myself?
    3. What should I do in response?

MORE TIME:

  1. Read Isaiah 65:1-16.
    1. Paul quotes vv.1-2 in his letter to the Romans. How does Romans 10:11-21 inform your understanding of Isaiah?
    2. Isaiah describes two kinds of people: those who rebel and forsake God, and those who are His servants. What do you observe about these two groups of people and their destinies?
    3. Matthew 13:24-30 contains the parable of the wheat and tares. How might this parable help you understand Isaiah 65:8? Don’t miss God’s grace!!!
  2. Read God promises to judge rebels and save a remnant. He also promises a complete transformation and re-creation of heaven and earth.
    1. How does Isaiah describe this New Heaven, New Earth and New Jerusalem? Compare this description to Revelation 21.
    2. Check out Colossians 1:15-18 and 2 Corinthians 5:17. What else do you learn about the new creation that God has begun?

GOING DEEPER (optional): For further teaching and application, do one or more of the following:

Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away;

 behold, the new has come.”

~ 2 Corinthians 5:17~

Lesson 46: Revival and the Descent of God (63:15-64:12)

This week we are focusing on Isaiah 63:15-64:12. Many consider Isaiah 63:7-64:12 to be one of the greatest intercessory prayers in the Bible. We saw last week that Isaiah begins his prayer by remembering God’s steadfast love and faithfulness in the past. Even though Israel was a rebellious people, God still rescued them physically out of Egypt for His Name’s sake. This week we will see that the only way God’s people can be saved spiritually is if God comes down and does it Himself! The following are some study suggestions to help you get started.

LIMITED TIME:

  1. Read through Isaiah 63:15-64:12.
  2. Meditate on and/or journal the answers to the following questions.
    1. What does this passage teach me about God and His character?
    2. How does this aspect of God’s character change my view of myself?
    3. What should I do in response?

MORE TIME:

  1. What does Isaiah confess about himself and the people of God?
  2. What does Isaiah observe about God?
  3. What does Isaiah pray for?
  4. If time permits, read Luke 1:1-2:38. How has God fulfilled the prayer of Isaiah in the birth of Christ?
  5. In what way(s) does Isaiah’s prayer of intercession affect your prayer life now?

GOING DEEPER (optional): For further teaching and application, do one or more of the following:

“Oh that you would rend the heavens and come down,

that the mountains might quake at your presence…

to make your name known to your adversaries,

and that the nations might tremble at your presence!”

~ Isaiah 64:1-2 ~

 “For I have come down from heaven, not to do My own will, but the will of Him who sent Me.”

~ John 6:38~

Lesson 45: Revival and the Wrath of the Lamb (62:8-63:14)

This week we are focusing on Isaiah 62:8-63:14. The following are some study suggestions to help you get started.

LIMITED TIME:

  1. Read through Isaiah 62:8-63:14.
  2. Meditate on and/or journal the answers to the following questions.
    1. What does this passage teach me about God and His character?
    2. How does this aspect of God’s character change my view of myself?
    3. What should I do in response?

MORE TIME:

  1. Read Isaiah 62:8-12. God is preparing a place for His people.
    1. What does Isaiah say about this place?
    2. What will God call His people?
    3. How do these descriptions affect the way you see yourself in God’s eyes?
  2. Read Isaiah 63:1-6. These verses are sobering! We see a picture of Christ’s triumph over evil.
    1. Isaiah is speaking as a watchman on the wall (62:6). What two questions does he ask? How are they answered?
    2. Read Revelation 6:15-17 and 19:11-16. What more do you observe about this “one who comes from Edom”?
  3. Read Isaiah 63:7-14. Just as Jesus will come to judge evil, Isaiah reminds us of His steadfast love and compassion for those who trust in Him. Outline or summarize these verses.
    1. What do you observe?
    2. How will you respond to what Jesus has done for you?

GOING DEEPER (optional): For further teaching and application, do one or more of the following:

“For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him. Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God.”

~ John 3:16-18 ~

Lesson 44: Revival, Preaching, and Prayer (61:1-62:7)

This week we are focusing on Isaiah 61:1-62:7. So far in Isaiah, God has laid out His case for the utter sinfulness of humanity. God will keep His covenant promise by sending His Servant to redeem His people. He alone will be able to set them free from their captivity to sin. The following are some study suggestions to help you get started.

LIMITED TIME:

  1. Read through Isaiah 61:1-62:7.
  2. Meditate on and/or journal the answers to the following questions.
    1. What does this passage teach me about God and His character?
    2. How does this aspect of God’s character change my view of myself?
    3. What should I do in response?

MORE TIME:

  1. Isaiah 61:1-2a is quoted by Jesus in Luke 4:16-21.
    1. What do you learn about Jesus in relation to these verses?
    2. What is He proclaiming and what is His mission?
    3. Thought question: Why do you think He stops in the middle of verses 2 of Isaiah 61?
  2. In Isaiah 62:6-7, Isaiah calls the people of God not to rest and to not let God rest. Why? (see also Matt 28:18-20; Romans 10:1-15)
  3. Why do you think preaching the good news of the gospel and persevering in prayer are important? (see also Luke 11:1-13)

GOING DEEPER (optional): For further teaching and application, do one or more of the following:

“Therefore, confess your sins to one another and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person has great power as it is working.”

~ James 5:16 ~

Lesson 43: Revival and World Renewal (59:14-60:22)

This week we are focusing on Isaiah 59:14-60:22. We are coming to the end of our study of Isaiah! May this week bring you encouragement in your walk with God! The following are some study suggestions to help you get started.

LIMITED TIME:

  1. Read through Isaiah 59:14-60:22.
  2. Meditate on and/or journal the answers to the following questions.
    1. What does this passage teach me about God and His character?
    2. How does this aspect of God’s character change my view of myself?
    3. What should I do in response?

MORE TIME:

  1. Read Isaiah 59:14-21.
    1. What does God observe about the world in the opening verses?
    2. How does God respond?
    3. Verse 21 is pivotal, speaking of God’s covenant with those whole repent from sin (v.20). What two things will God give His people that He says will never depart? (see also Jeremiah 31:31-34; Ezekiel 36:22-27; John 14:23-26; Acts 2:4)
  2. Read Isaiah 60. One day our Redeemer will return as a conquering warrior to judge the earth and bring glory to His people. Jot down what you observe in this chapter and compare it to the picture of the New Jerusalem in Revelation 21. Meditate on this future hope of glory we have in Christ!

GOING DEEPER (optional): For further teaching and application, do one or more of the following:

“Jesus answered him, “If anyone loves me, he will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our home with him. Whoever does not love me does not keep my words. And the word that you hear is not mine but the Father’s who sent me. “These things I have spoken to you while I am still with you. But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you all things and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you.”

 ~ John 14:23-26 ~

Lesson 42: Revival and Responsibility (58:1-59:13)

This week we are focusing on Isaiah 58:1-59:13. Jesus dies not only so that our sins could be forgiven, but also so that we could live a righteous life. The following are some study suggestions to help you get started.

LIMITED TIME:

  1. Read through Isaiah 58:1-59:13.
  2. Meditate on and/or journal the answers to the following questions.
    1. What does this passage teach me about God and His character?
    2. How does this aspect of God’s character change my view of myself?
    3. What should I do in response?

MORE TIME:

  1. Read Isaiah 58.
    1. Jot down an outline of what is happening in verses 1-5. What applications can you make for us today?
    2. Verses 6-14 can be broken down into three cycles of true obedience and resulting blessings. See if you can identify these cycles. What kind of obedience reflects true faith? What are the blessings of true faith?
  2. Read Isaiah 59:1-13.
    1. How does v.1-3 answer the question raised in Isaiah 58:3? What separates us from God?
    2. What sinful actions do you observe in verses 4-8? Paul quotes vv.7-8 in Romans 3:15-17. What does Romans 3:9-20 add to your understanding of Isaiah?
    3. What is the main message found in verses 9-13? What does God promise to those who sincerely confess their sin? (see also 1 John 1:9; Psalm 51).

GOING DEEPER (optional): For further teaching and application, do one or more of the following:

“For you were called to freedom, brothers. Only do not use your freedom as an opportunity for the flesh, but through love serve one another. For the whole law is fulfilled in one word: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

~ Galatians 5:13-14 ~

Lesson 41: Revival and the Heart of the Contrite (56:1-57:21)

This week we are focusing on Isaiah 56:1-57:21. The following are some study suggestions to help you get started.

LIMITED TIME:

  1. Read through Isaiah 56:1-57:21.
  2. Meditate on and/or journal the answers to the following questions.
    1. What does this passage teach me about God and His character?
    2. How does this aspect of God’s character change my view of myself?
    3. What should I do in response?

MORE TIME:

  1. Jesus died for the sins of not only Israel, put also for the ‘foreigner’ and ‘eunuch’ as well. Read Isaiah 56.
    1. What message does God have for the foreigner and eunuch (vv.1-8)?
    2. What does God have to say to the ‘dogs’ and ‘shepherds’ (vv.9-12)? (see also Ezekiel 34; John 10:1-18; Matt 7:15)
  2. Read Isaiah 57.
    1. What do you observe about the righteous and the wicked? How are they described? What do they fear? What is their destiny?
    2. Who is this ‘One who is high and lifted up (v.14)? (see also John 12:20-33)
    3. Meditate on verses 17-19. They are full of God’s grace! Hoe do these verses give you hope?

GOING DEEPER (optional): For further teaching and application, do one or more of the following:

  • Read chapter 41, Revival and the Heart of the Contrite (56:1-57:21)” in Isaiah: God Saves Sinners or listen to Ray Ortlund’s sermon series on line. (Most of the sermons correspond to the chapters in his book.)
  • Listen to the sermon(s) from Pastor Liam Goligher’s sermon series on Isaiah that go along with this week’s reading.

“He was in the world, and the world was made through him, yet the world did not know him. He came to his own, and his own people did not receive him. But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God, who were born, not of blood nor of the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God.”

~ Romans 10-13 ~

Lesson 40: When Grace Dances (54:1-55:13)

By means of very quick review, God lays out His case against Israel and the nations in Isaiah 1-39. All of humanity deserves the wrath and judgement of God for their disobedience and lack of faith in Him. Despite our sinfulness and total inability to come to God on our own, He is a promise keeping God who provides the way of salvation. Isaiah 40-55 describes God’s plan of redemption through His Suffering Servant. This week we will be looking at the consequences of the Servant’s death. Divinely accomplished, salvation has been achieved! An invitation has gone out to two groups of people: Zion (ch.54) and the whole world (ch.55). Keep this in mind as you study this week.

LIMITED TIME:

  1. Read through Isaiah 54:1-55:13.
  2. Meditate on and/or journal the answers to the following questions.
    1. What does this passage teach me about God and His character?
    2. How does this aspect of God’s character change my view of myself?
    3. What should I do in response?

MORE TIME:

  1. Paul quotes Isaiah 54:1 in Galatians 4:26-28. How do these verses aid your understanding of what is happening in Isaiah 54?
  2. As you read Isaiah 54-55 meditate on the heart of God and what Jesus has accomplished on the cross. What has He accomplished for repentant sinners? What has He accomplished for all of creation?
  3. Isaiah 54:11-17 is a picture of a renewed Jerusalem under the protective hand of God. Compare this with the New Jerusalem in Revelation 21:10-27.
  4. How will you respond to what God has done for you in Christ?

GOING DEEPER (optional): For further teaching and application, do one or more of the following:

The Spirit and the Bride say, “Come.” And let the one who hears say, “Come.” And let the one who is thirsty come; let the one who desires take the water of life without price.

~ Revelation 22:17 ~

Lesson 39: Guilt, Substitution, Grace (52:13-53:12)

We have reached the last of the four Servant songs in Isaiah. These verses add more to the description of God’s Servant (Messiah),  His mission and the price He would pay to complete that mission. As you read Isaiah 52:13-53:12, take some time to really meditate on the love of God for you and what Jesus actually accomplished on the cross for us.

LIMITED TIME:

  1. Read through Isaiah 52:13-53:12.
  2. Meditate on and/or journal the answers to the following questions.
    1. What does this passage teach me about God and His character?
    2. How does this aspect of God’s character change my view of myself?
    3. What should I do in response?

MORE TIME:

  1. How does Jesus fulfill the description of God’s Servant? (Check out some cross references in your Bible. Here is one to get you started- Acts 8:26-37. Also, check out the crucifixion narratives in the Gospels if you have time.)
  2. What does in 53:12 that “..he bore the sin of many, and makes intercession for the transgressors”? (see also Romans 8:34; Hebrews 7:25)

GOING DEEPER (optional): For further teaching and application, do one or more of the following:

“Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come. All this is from God, who through Christ reconciled us to himself and gave us the ministry of reconciliation; that is, in Christ God was reconciling the world to himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation. Therefore, we are ambassadors for Christ, God making his appeal through us. We implore you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God. For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.” ~ 1 Corinthians 5:17-21 ~

Lesson 38: Wachet Auf (51:9-52:12)

This week we are focusing on Isaiah 51:9-52:12. Israel calls on God to “Awake, awake” and rescue them from physical captivity (51:9-11). God in turn calls on Israel to awaken themselves, because He will soon rescue them spiritually (51:12-52:12). As you read this week, think about what God is saying to His people on both a physical and spiritual level. Many times He uses physical realities to point to spiritual truths. The following are some study suggestions to help you get started.

LIMITED TIME:

  1. Read through Isaiah 51:9-52:12.
  2. Meditate on and/or journal the answers to the following questions.
    1. What does this passage teach me about God and His character?
    2. How does this aspect of God’s character change my view of myself?
    3. What should I do in response?

MORE TIME:

  1. It might be helpful to jot down an outline or write a short summary of what is happening in these verses.
  2. How does God answer the question of ‘who will comfort you’? (v.19)
  3. Only the ‘clean’ will enter Zion according to 52:1. Who does God declare as clean and unclean? (see also Acts 10:1-11:18; 1 Cor. 6:11)
  4. Isaiah 52:7-12 poetically describes God’s promise to rescue His People from their sin. Paul quotes verse 7 in Romans 10:13-15. What light do these verses shed on the proclamation of God’s saving work?

GOING DEEPER (optional): For further teaching and application, do one or more of the following:

Oh give thanks to the LORD, for he is good; for his steadfast love endures forever!

Let Israel say, “His steadfast love endures forever.”

Let the house of Aaron say, “His steadfast love endures forever.”

Let those who fear the LORD say, “His steadfast love endures forever.”

Out of my distress I called on the LORD; the LORD answered me and set me free.

The LORD is on my side; I will not fear. What can man do to me?  ~Psalm 118:1-6~

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